6 Films that Fueled the DSLR (R)evolution

Flixlist by Robin Schmidt

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<="" common="" a="" with="" films="" of="" list="" share="" to="" bloggers="" and="" shakers="" social="" filmmakers,="" invite="" we="" blog.="" guest="" the="" site,="" on="" feature="" new="">Our first blogger/filmmaker is Robin Schmidt. He is a great filmmaker, writer, and musician. His current personal project is a YouTube series called “Stenderz“, a weekly parody music video recapping that weeks episode of EastEnders, a soap opera on BBC One. I still have no idea what Eastenders is but I LOVE Stenderz, and look forward to seeing the how they pull of great productions every single week. Episode 9, The Katy Perry One went online last week and is arguably better than the original music video and song, at least on a scale of awesomeness. Episode 10 went online today, parody of UK rapper, Tinie Tempah.

Without further ado, here is our first list! Focusing on some early productions shot on DSLRs and how they lead Robin down the road to large sensor video shooting. There is a certain style and aesthetic that is associated with DSLRs, and after watching some of these films you’ll find a new view on how the camera is just a tool and doesn’t dictate how your film will look

6 Films that Fueled the DSLR (R)evolution

Spring 2012. The most futuristic year I’ve ever lived in. We now have iPad 3, touch screens are rapidly replacing everything with fingerprints (oh those forensic boys will have a field day) and filmmakers scoff at large chip powerhouses like the C300 with frightening blasts of self-important over-exaggerated sense of entitlement. We live in blessed times, gorging on cheap lenses and easy access production value, somehow persuading ourselves that this makes us valid and important. And, weirdly, it probably does. But only briefly. Andy Warhol’s prediction that we will all be famous for 15 minutes ‘the future’ has somehow come true. Anyone even vaguely involved in socialmedia knows that fame is the currency that drives the extraordinary virulent growth of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. And Fame is what has driven the uptake of the large chip sensor ‘revolution’. It isn’t a revolution, by the way, more an evolution, but this isn’t the place for that argument. read more...

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