Apple Final Cut Pro X

cnet Australia by Wilson Tang

Final Cut Pro X is truly a dramatic rewrite of Apple's mature and well-developed video-editing software. It borrows some interface elements from iMovie that may disappoint seasoned professionals, and it also loses many key features that are simply an absolute necessity in the professional world, like XML export. On the other hand, those looking to upgrade from iMovie will find a lot more features in Final Cut Pro X, but there are some caveats.

Final Cut Pro X's bold philosophy of video editing will definitely take some getting used to, but in return, editors will be rewarded with blazing performance and a future where tapes are as outdated as wax cylinders. For amateur video editors, iMovie is still the best balance of features, ease of use and price. At this stage, Final Cut Pro X is a 1.0 product that still needs some more development. However, Apple has laid the groundwork for versions 2.0 and 3.0 to be much more compelling and usable.

Introduction

It's been three years since Apple last updated its venerable Final Cut Studio 3 suite of applications. FCS 3, as it was known, included Final Cut Pro 7, DVD Studio Pro 4, Motion 4, Soundtrack Pro 3, Color 1.5 and Compressor 3.5. Forces are at work changing the world of video editing, and even the most hardened video-editing professionals will tell you that editing needs to evolve.

First, the cost of productions has dropped drastically in the last few years. An indie film 10 years ago might have achieved some notoriety for being shot on a consumer MiniDV camcorder, but these days you'll find the same Canon 5D Mark II that you have at home on a $1 million set. read more...

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