MacWorld by By Jeff Carlson Final Cut Express The newly released Final Cut Express 4 addresses two big events directly: the shift to camcorders that record to high-capacity memory cards, mini-DVDs, or built-in hard disks, and this summer’s release of iMovie ’08. Jeff Carlson takes a first look at the video-editing app and finds more than just an alternative to iMovie ’08 but a missing next step that restores the control enjoyed by iMovie HD users. In the year-and-a-half since Apple released the last version of its intermediate video editor , a couple of big events have disrupted the state of editing video on the Mac. For one, the digital camcorder field has shifted steadily away from tape-based cameras to models that record to high-capacity memory cards, mini-DVDs, or built-in hard disks. The switch isn’t just a matter of capacity, however; those devices record to different formats than the standard DV used by most tape camcorders. Until now Final Cut Express hasn’t been able to read them. read more...

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