Nice Guide for First Time Drone Purchasers
Rebecca Bozzo, guest blogger for Premiere Gal, drone enthusiast, and post producer put together a great guide for buying your first drone.

Buying Your First Drone: A Guide

Youtuber Casey Neistat has a cemetery for all his broken drones, and having talked to a lot of pilots, they all say one thing—eventually, you’re going to crash one. Many say the newer DJI drones, like the Phantom 4 and Mavic, have such good gps technology and censors that they practically fly themselves. But for new pilots, investing several hundred or thousand dollars might seem daunting. So what should your first drone be? Use this list to help you decide.

DJI Phantom 4 Pro Level: Professional Price: $1499

Drone PRO: If you learn on this drone and end up flying it commercially, then once you’re certified, you can hit the ground running. It features a 4K camera, obstacle avoidance, and different flight-tracking modes. DJI offers a care plan which costs an extra $149 and covers up to two replacement units over a one-year period. CON: It’s a big investment, but the care plan definitely helps (as long as you don’t crash it more than twice).

DJI Mavic Pro Level: Professional Price: $999

Drone PRO: As you can see in this review, the Mavic is very small and portable compared to the Phantom 4 Pro, meaning it could be great for a traveling commercial pilot. It has a 4K camera, obstacle avoidance, and various flight-tracking modes. DJI’s care plan is also cheaper on this drone at $99. CON: Still a hefty investment for beginner pilots. Also, it’s very light. Some people find that a little difficult to control.

DJI Phantom 3: Standard Level: Intermediate

Price: $499

Drone

PRO: The Phantom 3 family has been on the market longer compared to The Phantom 4. However, the Standard model has a 2.7K camera, which still totally has a place in the commercial market. It also has the return-to-home feature, so it will come back to you if it gets too far away or if the battery is low. The DJI care plan on this one costs $129. CON: It doesn’t feature obstacle avoidance, which could be a big deal for a new pilot. Also, once you’re certified, you may need to upgrade to one of the drones mentioned above, all depends on what you think you may being doing as a commercial pilot.
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