Quick Guide to Composite Photography

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PhotoKey 7 Pro is green screen photo software popular with photography studio and video production professionals. The software analyzes your photos and instantly switches out the green screen for a brand new background of your choice enabling you to composite unique images and templates with filters, layers and text. PhotoKey 7 Pro also has an integrated plugin for Adobe Photoshop CC, which allows you to switch between them whenever you want.

17,000 hours in a studio: A quick guide to composite photography

FXHome blog by Erin Patel You’ve planned your final composite image, photographed your background, and now you have to bring it all together by shooting against a green screen. Now in my tenth year as a professional photographer, I feel most at home in a studio and love the challenges that shooting for composites can present. Of course, you don’t need a fully equipped studio – I’ve created great composite work before using only a single, off camera speedlight and a piece of green fabric hung from a door in my dining room. Simple and still reasonably effective! Wherever you decide to make your foreground images for your composite, there are three steps to consider that can really help you to get the perfect looking image each time.

Reference your background

This may seem obvious but you’d be surprised at how many times I’ve had my concept sketches in place, final image all planned out, lighting set up, only then to take a shot that looks nothing like I had envisioned. You can easily be distracted by any number of elements when shooting: lighting, positioning your model, hyperactive pug dogs stealing your diffusers (true story!), leaving you more likely to fall foul of basic mistakes such as pointing your model in the wrong direction or . . . [continue reading]
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CompositingFxhomeGreen screenPhotokey 7 pro

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