Digital Arts by Neil Bennett Once the underdog to video-editing applications from the likes of Adobe and Avid, Apple’s Final Cut Pro has since become the industry standard for desktop cut-&-correct work. Originally targeting the software at wedding videographers and corporate video producers, Apple now has its sights on all levels of production, from single editors with local clients to those cutting Hollywood movies. Wherever you are in this broad spectrum of users, you’re certain to find a use for one or more of the new tools added to the six core applications that comprise Final Cut Studio 2 – Final Cut Pro 6, Color, Motion 3, Soundtrack Pro 2, Compressor 3, and DVD Studio Pro 4. The suite’s core component, Final Cut Pro 6, has few new major additions. That said, neither the in-beta Premiere Pro CS3 nor recent upgrades to Xpress Pro have added groundbreaking features – so perhaps we’ve reached the limit of what’s possible from a traditional desktop NLE. read more...

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