Event DV by Jan Ozer bluray burnMost of us at EventDV, myself included, have been HDV cheerleaders, promoting the new format despite the glaring fact that you couldn't actually play high-def video in your living room on any standard optical media. We'd talk about the ability to losslessly pan and zoom within the video, a technical possibility but efficiency nightmare, or preserving quality for future delivery. But at the end of the day, you had to downsample your gorgeous 1920x1080 or 1280x720 video down to a relatively pedestrian 720x480 for delivery to your client, a frankly depressing process. With consumer high-definition standards hopelessly mired in the HD DVD/Blu-ray format war, I stopped shooting in HDV months ago since DV was easier to edit and all I really needed (or could deliver). Well, brothers and sisters, I'm here to tell you today that this has all changed, and for the blessed first time, wedding videographers are in a perfect position to exploit HD—from acquisition to delivery. Why, you ask? Because the format war is over and all is hunky-dory in the world of HD optical disc? No, far from it. The reason we can take advantage of it where others can't is because as personal event videographers, we produce for an extremely limited audience. And after a bride or her parents pay thousands for a wedding, forking over an extra $500 for an HD DVD or Blu-ray player to watch the video in high-definition is peanuts. You can even do the legwork for them and build the player into the package (and your price). Sure, you'll have to deliver SD DVDs as well, but finally, you'll have a playback platform that does justice to the high-def video you've been shooting. Feeling inspired? Well this article discusses three ways to produce high-definition video for viewing on either HD DVD or Blu-ray players—three solutions that will work for us right now. Briefly, these involve using Apple DVD Studio Pro or Pinnacle Studio to burn HD DVD-formatted discs on your current DVDÂ ±R/RW burner for playback on an HD DVD set top player, or using Roxio DVDit Pro HD to record projects to a Blu-ray recorder for playback on a Blu-ray set-top player. read more...

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